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. what can we do for you? >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. i'm kathy kay. armed with new job numbers and old attack lines, the two candidates for president begin their final pitches. the new york marathon cancelled amid suffering after sandy. residents of staten island say they've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the r
, "bbc world news." >> this is a special edition of bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm kathy kaye. president obama joins campaign workers to dial up support in the final hours. >> we feel we have the votes to win. >> his rival, mitt romney is off to the polls, and then bet -- back to the campaign trail for one final push. >> we are going to steer this country back on to a course that will help the american people have a brighter future. >> and taking a spin back in time, tonight, we will show you how the competitors have stacked up over the years. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere are around the globe. election day is finally here and across the huge country, people are finally casting their ballots. today, neither candidate was taking any chances, mounted a last-minute effort to get us support at the polls. -- to get the best support at the polls. >> this is america, a democracy. this is what it is all about. >> will he stay in power for another four years or be rejected after one term? the president is checking to make sure there i
businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and "bbc world news america." >>> this is "bbc world news america." taking to the fight to the heart of israel. set to receive britain's backing, syriana's new opposition leaders have talks in london. and the unmistakable sound of led zeppelin. we talked to jimmy page about their special honor in the u.s. >>> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. we begin with dramatic developments in the middle east. palestinian militants have fired a rocket all the way to jerusalem for the first time in decades. they have also targeted tel aviv. israel has risen but by calling up reserve troops and stepping up its bombardment of gaza. in a moment, a report from the gaza strip were there more civilian casualties today. first, we have this report from tel aviv. >> today, and the heart of israel, sirens scream for people to take cover from rocket fire. the past 24 hours have come as quite a shock. even for the million israelis living close to gaza, fear is part of their daily lives, the mortar and rocket fire
: where is america 2012, 236 years after its birth, and where is it going? the challenge for the next administration are both immediate and deep. no great country has sustained its position without a strong economic foundation. the new president and new congress must deal with the fiscal cliff, partisan gridlock has prevented us from making the hard decisions about where we need to spend and where we need to cut and how we bridge a growing economic inequality. while we remain the richest country in the world, the global economic order is rebalancing. the application of american power is changing as we have seen in the response to the arab spring. old alliances need redefining. the pivot to the east demands understanding between china and the united states and the realization that it is not a zero-sum game but also problems that transcend relationships among nations, questions of climate change, global health and the progress of science. science and technology are giving us extraordinary insight into who we are and how much we share. they have enormous power for both state and non-stat
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbcworld news america." tensions flare in the middle east as israel and palestinian militants exchanged rocket fire. bp pays a record fine and plead guilty to criminal charges. more than two years after a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. t
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> we are reporting from washington. one day to go, three states to visit. president obama uses the final hours to campaign for every vote he can. >> after all we've been through together, we can't give up now. because we've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood,
>> this is "bbc world news america." >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. the scam which brought down the c.i.a. director spread further. now it is the actions of the top u.s. commander in afghanistan called into question. failing its mandate, the bbc gains access into an internal report showing the united nations failed to protect civilians in sri lanka. >> they left actually at the moment the population needed them more than ever. the government wanted them out of the way essentially because they didn't want anyone to see what was happening. >> running the world in just a week. a ma
. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome. it's the weekend after, and barack obama is back in the white house, democrats are back in control of the senate, and republicans are back running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 a
businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news america. >> this is bbc world news america. aseral patras' steps down the cia director after admitting to an extramarital affair, sending shock waves through washington. and on the political front, it is back to business. can the parties to strike a deal to reverse the looming economic difficulties? a new teen-age magician in town is making quite a market in south africa. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. it was a rather unexpected resignation. a short time ago, general david is stepping down as cia director. president obama accepted the resignation of the retired four- star general. he praised his outstanding service. michael, how much of a shock was this? >> it was pretty much a surprise, the general, as far as i know, was very well-thought of at the agency. certainly a defender of the agency and several weeks ago, he made it very clear after the attack that no one at the agency prevented assistance going to the man going under attack. it was the white house -- >>
's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvia hall in washington- still ahead, u.s. borrowers owe more than $1 trillion in student loan debt. so could helping them pay it down be a $1 trillion industry? i'll introduce you to some entrepreneurs who think so. >> susie: besides the fiscal cliff, investors and traders on wall street were talking about some merger news today. leucadia national is buying jefferies group. it already owns 28% of the investment firm. the $3.6 billion deal, could help jefferies push into the lucrative mergers advisory business. leucadia is a conglomerate with a wide range of businesses from beef processing to timber. also today, sherwin williams is buying consorcio comex, it's a mexican coatings business. the price: $2.3 billion. >> susie: the united states will be the top oil producer in the world by the year 2020, surpassing saudi arabia, and russia. that's the bold call today from the international energy agency. fueling that energy renaissance: a boost in oil and shale gas because of new technologies like fracking. the g
.e. and bank of america. it all leads up to friday when the president sits down with congressional leaders at the white house to begin the real negotiations, and both sides enter those talks claiming a mandate to protect the principals the voters endorsed at the ballot box. >> darren gersh is with us tonight from our washington, d.c. bureau, where a week after election day here. was there any progress made by the staffs of the political players during the campaign season? where do we stand? >> the staff is always looking at this as a giant chess game and trying to figure out how they can give their bosses their best move, so the staff have been working. we had a lot of commissions and a lot of efforts to try to solve the budget problems. there is a lot of work done behind the scenes and on paper. a deal could come together pretty quickly. the problem is the principals, the leaders, the people who were elected, they have to come back and decide what they're going to do. they're talking about getting an agreement, but nobody knows how to get that agreement right now. >> tom: it pays to parse
with that speech of not white america, red, america. if he wins he's going to win because he was the president of black america, hispanic america, single white women -- overwhelming -- >> if he gets 40% of the white vote -- john kerry got that amount. >> it's not just the fact that president obama is african-american. we're so far from his ideal vision in 2004. in the mid 1930's is astonishing. that's lower than george w. bush won the hispanic vote in 2004. gwen: neither campaign are terribly concerned about that. they just want to win at all cost. do we see any kind -- everybody says it doesn't matter who shows up. as we watch get out the vote efforts an we watch voter disputes and the lawyers being dispatched around the country, is there anything happening that we don't see that doesn't show up in the polls? >> it is the first election since 2004 that's "normal." >> 2006 was a wave, 2010 was a wave. everybody saw the same data. and they were disagreing around the margin. now both sides have a fundamentally different view. it's not just these conversations with the campaigns, the presidential
businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." i am katty kay. an assault as engines rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town th
battleground states. he won the electoral vote. he won the popular vote of -- and he won an america that revealed itself to be more divided than ever. today the president walked into the east room saying elections have consequences. >> what the american people are looking for is corporation. they're looking for consensus. they're looking for common sense. most of all, they want action. i intend to deliver for them in my second term i expect to find willing partners in both parties to make that happen. so let's get to work. gwen: the obama campaign pieced together a electoral puzzle. how did they put it together? >> they had multiple paths to get to 270. they used almost all of them. they were able to through very focused data-driven ground operation identify their voters and successfully reassemble the coalition that they had in 2008. african americans, latino, -- latinos, young voters, women. would young voters turn out in the numbers they did before? in fact, they were by one point a higher percentage than they were in 2008. would african americans vote with the same enthusiasm co
talk about de niro. that's the way it is in the east coast of america if you're italian. that's just what happens. >> rose: how did the friendship develop? >> we got to be friends because of "limitless." we met when we were on one of the juries in tribeca and we talked about "limitless." we met and talked about doing it -- >> and if i could just say one thing. this is what's great about him. i put myself on tape to play his son in the movie. >> rose: oh, i remember this. >> but, you know, you took the time knowing that i wasn't going to get it, sam rockwell may have been already cast. he took the time to say to brian "hey, that kid who made that tape, let me meet him in between 700 things. let me take five minutes and say to him stay on track." >> rose: you're not going to get the role. but i see something. >> i see something and he gave me a hug. for an actor trying to make his way, i mean, that is like gold. better. it's better. >> rose: roll tape. here's another scene in the relationship between the two of you. >> how are you doing, mr. de niro, my name is bradley cooper. my quest
, but still latin america, but they have different ideas about how to deal with the imgriggs issue. governor romney and the self deportation situation has not necessarily found a significant audience even in south florida. nonetheless as the latest poll shows, he has been gaining some strength with voters in north and central florida. >> susan: thanks, tom. we'll catch up with you later in the program. virginia is another crucial state, and will be one of the first swing states to tally election results tonight. polls close at 7:00 p.m. eastern time, and the race looks close, a mirror of the national race. darren gersh joins us from virginia. darren. >> reporter: susie, we're here in woodbridge, virginia, which is considered a swing area in a key swing state. and it's a state that also surprised the candidates this election. after the voting here is over, you'll be hearing a lot more about the fiscal cliff, those automatic spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to take effect on january 1. you'd think the fiscal cliff would be a huge issue here. virginia depends heavily on defense spendin
america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic signals out today point in the same direction-- an economy that has moved through a rough couple of months last spring has now found stability. >> slow growth need not be fragile, so we are in a moderate growth phase that appears to be quite durable. it's going to be hard to break out significantly in one direction or the other, unless we get a policy surprise or a policy mistake. >> reporter: the adp payroll snapshot is seen as a kind of preview for the government's official employment report, which comes out tomorrow. factoring in job losses in state and local government, adp projects the labor department will likely say the economy created roughly 130,000 jobs in october. barclays economist michael gapen expects the unemp
obama to latin american dictators hugo chavez and fidel castro. >> we are america's women. >> woodruff: and american future fund, a super pac supporting romney is running ads targeting women in michigan and pennsylvania, states considered safely democratic. as you can see on the "newshour's" vote 2012 map center" there are seven states currently considered by the associated press to be true toss ups: nevada, colorado, iowa, ohio, virginia, florida and new hampshire. it shows each candidate's quickest potential path to 270 electoral votes. including one scenario giving president obama a path to victory, winning nevada and ohio, to get to 277 electoral votes. for mitt romney the path could also lead through ohio, and blanketing the south, to get to 281 in a different scenario. and there are also several potentials for a tie. this one shows the president losing nevada but winning ohio, to get to 269 for both candidates. and late today, the "newshour" got word that romney will make a last-minute stop in pennsylvania over the weekend. we explore the race and the states in play with jonathan
, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it. >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup efforts in the northeast. ray suarez updates the slow climb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our report. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, the assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff: we have a "battleground" dispatch from iowa, where immigration is rarely mentioned by the candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa's population, their numbers have increased by 110% over the last ten years. >> brown: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> intel >> support also comes from carnegie c
give way to the strong. america's current preoccupation with china has produced these political attack ads as well as plenty of campaign rhetoric. >> they are artificially lowering their prices and killing american jobs. we cannot let china run all over us. >> barack obama returned to the white house having promised to hold china to account for its trading practices. what is he going to do about it now? those who have been inside the white house suggest it will be gentle diplomacy. >> there is a gap between political campaigning and governing. i think that some of the tough rhetoric you heard will not translate into policy. presidents do have an ability to use various tools to shape policy towards china and other countries. >> of course, it is not about trade. there are human rights and security concerns and the worries flag up by this campaign commercial. >> see our economy is getting very weak. >> china is buying up american dead but it can be used as a source of pressure. u.s. diplomats insist that they still do defend their national interest. >> currency valuations have been a curr
how barack obama and mitt romney plan to fix some of america's most serious problems. the stakes could not be much higher. nearly five years after the start of the great recession, more than 20 million americans are unemployed or under-employed. the national debt has soared 16 trillion dollars. and our ability to fund medicare is in doubt. tens of millions of americans still don't have medical insurance. and the nation faces challenges around the world -- from the middle east to china. later in the broadcast jeffrey brown of the pbs newshour will look at some critical issues all but been ignored during the campaign. frontline will examine key moments that shaped both candidates' lives when they were young men. political journalists and authors will join gwen ifill on the "washington week" set to discuss how the presidency has transformed many of the men who have won it. and jeff greenfield of "need to know" will weigh in on this question: how can we predict which candidates will become successful presidents? but we begin with a look at the most pressing problems facing the nation today
for you? >> now bbc world news america. israel kills the leader of hamas in the of the, causing an escalation of violence. governments should stop cutting benefits and start creating jobs. welcome to manhattan, kansas. >> may know more about technology than a tomcat's knows about baking gingerbread. >> welcome to our viewers. israel killed the military commander of hamas and launched a series of attacks. hamas vowed in this would open the gates to hell. military action will continue. >> for the people of gaza, it looked like a war, and as in most wars, civilians are caught up in the violence. the first target today was the biggest hamas's most senior military leader was typify and -- hit by a military strike. he died instantly. hamas says this is a major provocation. good >> they will pay a price for this, because he was one of our most exceptional leaders. >> she sat at the top of the military wing. tonight israel published these images. the army released video footage of him being tracked and the moment when his car was hit. israel said the strike followed a wave of rocket att
the all-important buckeye state. >> it's a big day for big change. we're about to change america to help people in ways they didn't imagine they could be helped with good jobs and better take-home pay. >> reporter: romney also traveled through pittsburgh, pennsylvania, seeking an upset in a state that hasn't voted republican for president in more than 20 years. and the campaign dispatched ryan to richmond, virginia, for one last appearance. and also released a five-minute video online. >> this isn't a campaign about me. and it's not a campaign even about conservatives versus liberals. or republicans versus democrats. it's really a time when america is going to have to ask, what are we as a country? >> reporter: meanwhile president obama finished his official campaigning last night with a rally in des moines, iowa. >> iowa, we're here tonight because we have more work to do. we're not done yet on this journey. we've got more road to travel. >> reporter: that road took the president home to chicago where he already had voted. today he met with volunteers at a campaign office and telephoned
hundreds of companies lending a helping hand to the victims of superstorm sandy. corporate america has pledged over $50 million. the big bank is offering $5 million in loans to affected small businesses and donating to the american red cross. other household names giving include coca-cola, delta airlines, disney, home depot, lowe's, the nfl and target. from fuel to cash to communications. verizon communications warned today hurricane sandy could wreak havoc on its fourth quarter earnings. the wireless, phone and internet provider took on major damage in the storm. four of its facilities in new york flooded. as sylvia hall reports, verizon's warning is a sign of the damage felt by the tele- communications industry. >> reporter: just like with other telecom companies, verizon employees are working hard to restore service to the northeast. but it's not easy when they're also pumping water out of the basements of their flooded new york facilities, which are running on generator power. the company announced today that sandy's aftermath will likely extend to fourth quarter earnings. analysts
third of america's children with the only health care they have. so there are many people to think about. i always think that the 535 people in congress who are going to make this decision, it's not really about them. it's about 360 million americans that need them to step up to a very tough issue, find a solution that works for all of americans, not just a few. >> brown: what should the stance of the president... what do you want the stance of the president to be coming out of this election? stick to some guns? compromise? where should he be? >> the president was really clear in this election that he was fighting to protect the middle class from more cuts and to do a deal that would get the economy moving again. what he said is he's going to stick to his guns on that. we think that's... our members who worked really hard and worked our guts out, were knocking on doors and making phone calls to elect the president, that's definitely what they think is needed. they've been fighting for two years to make sure we ultimately get, that we ask, you know, the wealthiest in this country to pay t
to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> it was a storm that rocked america, bringing devastation to the eastern seaboard. we look back at the impact of hurricane sandy. >> i don't know what's going on. >> nobody was ready for this. this has never happened before, ever. >> i had an incredible view of the waves crashing over everything, was so enamored by it, i wasn't scared. >> india to conduct clinical trials how poor indians are being used as human guinea pigs. >> please don't do these trials on poor people. rich people can overcome these, but the whole family suffers. >> it's the technology that's set to transform the manufacturing industry. press control p and get lots of print on paper, but the pen, too. >> i think eventually it will completely transform the way products are made. >> hello. new york, the city that never sleeps. a good reason to stay awake. superstorm seaped shut down the subway system and stock exchange and the presidential election campaigning. it has been a shock to a country built on a belief in man's destiny to create a better world, but there are limits.
. that's how republican in post goldwater america virginia had become. that clearly is not the virginia that we're looking at tonight. >> a very different state. ifill: let me ask mark and david about that question because i'm curious about what changed. what happened between 1976 that richard was just talking about and today that virginia is so different? it's just an influx of different kinds of people? younger people that ray was talking about? we saw wisconsin where the president had a huge rally with all those people in madison a couple of days ago and maybe that was a sign? are we seeing some sort of fundamental shift that virginia going to guide us on? >> northern virginia... you know, seven out of the ten richest counties in the country are the d.c. counties. it turns out if you send 25% or 30% of your g.d.p. to washington we keep a little. it goes into the extremely rich counties, fairfax county even down to prince williams county, louden county which we mentioned. these northern virginia counties are booming counties. a lot more population. a lot of people from out of state. h
't be the voice of america. >> reporter: in response, the president was vehement in his defense of ambassador rice. >> let me say specifically about susan rice, she has done exemplary work. she has represented the united states and our interests in the united nations with skill and professionalism and toughness and grace. as i've said before, she made an appearance at the request of the white house in which she gave her best understanding of the intelligence that had been provided to her. if senator mccain and senator graham and others want to go after somebody, they should go after me, and i'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador, who had nothing to do with benghazi and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received, and to besmirch her reputation is outrageous. >> reporter: back on domestic issues, president obama pledged quick action in a second term on comprehensive immigration reform. he used a question from the correspondent for telemundo to point to his strong support from latinos in the election. >> this is the
polarizing issues in america. two states-- oregon and washington-- have legalized doctor-assisted suicide, and only for the terminally ill. but around the country, people who want help dying aren't waiting for the laws to change. instead, they've gone underground. this is a journey told from the inside, far from public view. this is the hidden world of assisted suicide. >> i'm not afraid of dying. i've always believed that death is nothing to fear. it's part of living. everybody has to do it. and i want to make sure that my death is going to be my way. >> narrator: if joan foley butterstein lived in oregon or washington, an open conversation with a doctor could allow her to end her life the way she's always lived it, on her own terms. by age 18, joan had set out on her own. she was a singer and a dancer at the latin quarter in new york city. she married tom foley, her high school sweetheart, and began her life as a marine wife. nine years later, their daughter kathleen was born. life was good. but then, after 54 years of marriage, tom got sick. >> my husband died of lung cancer. and he we
g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome. the sherlock holmes of money in politics -- trevor potter -- is here with some clues to what the billionaires and super pacs got for their lavish spending in the most expensive election in our history. in a nutshell, you ain't seen nothing yet. but first, if you've been curious about why new york mayor mike bloomberg endorsed barack obama for re-election, just take another look at the widespread havoc caused by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's global warming, stupid: if hurricane sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. a
. in the 1800 alexis de tocqueville said in america every dispute ends up a lawsuit. we've seen that over and over again the way we run elections in this country in a somewhat slap dash and easily manipulated way where partisan politicians often control the mechanics of voting. >> brown: kurt anderson, you've been looking into this too. what other siendz of things that have you seen that is potentially happening that lawyers are watching >> there's a big issue with regard to the poll watchers and monitors. a group connected to the tea party based in houston has promising to bring thousands of monitors to various places to essentially what they say make sure that the vote goes correctly and the people who are eligible to vote do vote. >> brown: against voter fraud yes. however, there's a lot of people on the side of sort of the voting rights, civil rights side of things who say that these poll watchers will be deployed in minority neighborhoods and places where historically there's been issues with voters being intimidated or harassed or in some way perhaps not get to go the polls. so the
they come to america. >> if you are worried about the issue that you brought up, there's a very simple solution which is we do something which from a policy point of view in this country is clearly in my opinion malpractice, which is that we recruit these most talented students. >> to go to our universities. >> to come to our universities. and then as soon as they graduate you say no, you may not stay here. a lot of them would like to stay here. and these are people who would create jobs. and so i think there's a kind of a jingoistic, a strange counter-- you know, something that's not all helpful, counterproduction. >> they we should staple a green card to their diploma. >> absolutely. if somebody comes here and gets a degree in neuroscience or computer science, organic chemistry, for goodness sake let's try to keep them. >> rose: i do hear a certain libertarian philosophy within you? >> i think of myself as a diverseitarian. so-and-so i think-- i like diverse systems. so for me, i think that there is, you know, what you want is a role for government. you definitely want a strong role
in the dow, were falling hard. bank of america down 3.6%. general electric falling 3.2%. home depot was at more than a decade high yesterday. today, some profit taking, down 3%. while there were fewer buyers than sellers for most stocks, retailer abercrombie and fitch saw buyers rush in, pushing the stock up above $40 per share for the first time since may. third quarter earnings were much better than expected. abercrombie earned $.87 per share, almost 50% more than anticipated. better inventory control met fewer sales, coupled with strong sales in scandinavia and china. here's that stock pop, up 34.5%. volume soared to 16 times in average pace. the store increased its full year outlook heading into the holidays. some analysts point out the stock had a bigger than average short position, meaning traders who were betting on the stock to drop, may have been forced to buy today, adding to the rally. another stock that may have benefited from bears being force to buy was facebook. despite the threat of hundreds of millions of shares becoming eligible for trading, facebook stock it at a
constructive meeting. we had a recognition that every person in america knows that we must reach agreement. >> we are prepared to put revenue on the table provided we fix the real problem. gwen: in agreeing that they must avoid what has come to be known as the dreaded fiscal cliff, the congressional leaders used the world "constructive" once each to describe today's white house meeting and the white house used it twice in its official statement. so did we see any real movement today or was it all just rhetoric, david? >> well, i think the first thing we saw is that the two sides have agreed it's in their interests to agree reasonable. during the campaign, everybody wanted to be resolute in their position. now we're in the appearing reasonable thing. secondly, as we saw mitch mcconnell say, the republicans have conceded that taxes are going to go up. there remains this huge issue which was not as far as we could tell resolved or discussed today, is the president going to insist on raising tax rates on the rich, or will he come up with some other way to get money out of rich people that the
, then by bank of america. then chase. the names changed. and we were almost homeless. >> yesenia barragan is working for her doctorate in latin american history in columbia university. >> we were able to gather enough resources, enough money within our family to save the house. so we like to say that we were the lucky once. i'm basically here because i don't want to live in a world where there are lucky ones and unlucky ones. >> my name is daniel lynch. i live in manhattan, and in my spare time i try to trade stocks. i might even be a center-right, and i still support this and i want people to know that right now 99% exactly, not have a i've been worried a long time about problems of welt inequality in the country and income inequality and i just wanted to throw my support a little. i don't march. i don't carry a sign. state taxes, income tax es it's capitalism. ers on the of capital are winning so much more than laborers. capital has no roots, right? and to just deny that that's happening and not have a little bit of an activist tax policy about it, i think it's my ev. it's destructive a
with the sights and sounds of the impact and tragedy of hurricane sandy. >> america's with you. we are standing behind you. and we are going to do everything we can to help you get back on your feet. >> rose: the remains of super storm sandy are still causing trouble as far west as wisconsin but it's nothing like the damage in the northeast. >> in new jersey, nearly two-third of cut mers remain without power. >> we knew it was going to be bad, but this was pretty devastating. >> the flooding, the destruction there is pretty severe. >> as you can see, there is plenty of standing water that still remains. >> houses and cars, we can replace. it's really not what's important at all. >> new york city is struggling to come to life after the storm. >> sea water that came over that wall has crippled lower manhattan. >> amount of outages that we're experience regular literally unprecedented. >> the worst thing that happened to this city certainly since 9/11. >> there was a devastating fire on the rockaway peninsula. more than 100 homes destroyed. >> my whole family lost everything. >> will you rebuild h
to change the way we deliver health care in america. and in doing that we reduce the cost of health care, we reduce the readmissions to hospitals, we do a better job on using technology, less tests. we manage the more complicated medical interventions. we reduce hospital infection rates. there's a lot of ways that you can reduce health-care costs by reducing health-care costs rereduce medicare cost and medicaid cost. that's the way to do it and i think we have to enforce those types of delivery system reforms. i think democrats an republicans are prepared to do that i agree with senator corker. we need to combine revenues with real savings in spending. and that means yes, we have to have reductions in the gross rate of health-care costs. >> brown: senator corker, we are talking, are you both in the senate chamber but do you see the kind of things you're talking about specifically on the revenue side, do you really feel that there is that potential for movement in the house? because i mean do you hear that in the language of mr. boehner an others today after the election? >> i do. >> brown: y
tuesday's results signal about a political and cultural shift in america? and what's next in this battle? we're joined by representatives from both sides of the argument. thomas peters is cultural director of the national organization for marriage. and lee swislow is the executive director of gay and lesbian advocates and defenders. thomas peters, wherever this battle ends up -- and it may take a long time -- was election did i a turning point? >> no, not at all. i think these were tactical wins. going into these four states we had no illusions. these were deep blue states. even despite all those political forces against us we still managed to have very close margins of a final tally. so what i'm hearing this week is that it's not a big shift. we are encouraged and to double down and renew our efforts >> suarez: how do you see it? i see it somewhat differently. i think it was hugely significant. i think it indicates really the kind of journey that the american people have been on over the last several years. in maine three years ago this same electorate voted against marriage equality af
residents will be disappointed. >> this is hard. this is one of the biggest natural disasters to hit america. certainly understandable that people are going to be frustrated and be upset on some of the challenges they're facing. we feel that. we understand that. >> reporter: fema is working with the city's office of emergency management, and they've been on the job since october 26, four days before the hurricane hit. city, state and federal officials are now coordinating recovery and relief operations. there are more than a hundred people in the operations center at any time and another 20,000 government employees and contractors on the ground. >> the way fema works is... is, we're not the whole team. we don't do anything autonomously. we do it in coordination with the state, and obviously we're coordinating very closely with the local officials as well. >> reporter: jensen says some government workers manning operations lost their homes too and know full well what's at stake. >> i've been out there and i've talked to survivors. it's pretty emotional. many of these people have lost everythi
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